How do I create an account?

Click sign up on the top-bar menu and a pop-up will appear with a form for you to fill out. You can either sign up using your email address or through your Facebook account.

How do I login?

Click the login button on the top-bar menu and a pop-up will appear that will prompt you to login with either your email address and password, or with your Facebook account.

How do I list my property?

Click the orange List Your Space button on the top-right of the top-bar menu and follow the instructions.

How do I view my listings?

To view your listings, hover your mouse over the button of the top-bar menu that says “Hello, (your username)” and select Manage Listings. This will take you to the Manage Listings tab of your dashboard.

How do I edit my listings?

On the Manage Listings page, click the edit button for the property that you wish to edit. This will take you back to the listing page for you to change details

How do I delete a listing?

On the Manage Listing's page, click the delete button for the property that you wish to delete. A pop-up will then appear verifying whether or not you wish to delete the listing; click yes to continue, or click no to go back.

Does it cost money to list my property?

Absolutely not! Users can post a listing at no cost; in fact, GuestHouser provides free listing, and more, by also including free marketing for all our hosts and premium services to our top performers.

When can I start booking customers?

We are currently in beta for our website which only includes listing properties. Very soon, GuestHouser will launch with all our listings for an international consumer-base. We will also be giving regular updates about our site progress via email so you will always be kept in the loop. In the meantime, thank you for your patience, and we are excited to have you with us.

I want to speak to someone on the phone.

You can view our Contact page to find our contact email and customer service line. If you have been contacted over the phone or email to list with GuestHouser, call the sales representative whose information was provided and they will answer all of your inquiries.




1. Create a Listing.

Create a listing for your property at no cost to you. Start by clicking the 'Become a Host' button at the top-right hand corner of every page to take you to the listing process. Simply follow the steps that take you through the process of filling out details, picking availability, and uploading photos and videos for your listing. At any point during the process, you can use the 'Back' button to make edits to previous sections, and to move forward, click the 'Next' button until you've filled out all the necessary portions and are ready to review and submit.

2. Get Connected.

Once your listing is live, it'll be made available for all GuestHouser users to search and book. We provide our users, both hosts and guests, with a portal where they can communicate and ultimately rent out rooms after proper discourse. Our site gives you plenty of feedback on the customer with our customer rating system that shows information on previous stays, so you'll never have to rent out your property without any feedback.

3. Book It!

Great, now that you've come to an agreement with a guest, you can now respond and choose to rent out the room. After receiving a request to book, you have a 24-hour period to respond by either verifying or declining. It is important to respond to these requests promptly, as late responses that go past the 24-hour period, or no response at all, will negatively affect your listing score and your search results.

4. Time to Host!!

Now you're ready to for the fun part: welcoming your guests and receiving payment; but, there are a few more things to complete the process. Make sure to coordinate with yours guests, prepare for their arrival, set-up check-in, and don't forget to review your customers to improve your accounts rating.


Step 1: Click the Green 'Become a Host' button

To begin, simply click the Green 'Become a Host' button located at the top-right of the top-bar menu. Once you click this button, you will be prompted to the next page

Step 2: Fill Out the Listing Pre-form page

Now, complete the four necessary fields on this page- Property Type, Room Type, Accommodates, and City. Once you have completed all fields, push next.

Step 3: Login/Sign Up If Necessary

After you push next, if you are not already logged in as a user, you will be prompted to login or sign up for the site. If you already have an account, login using your email or your facebook account; and if you’re signing up for the first time, you can do so by using your email address or your facebook account. Once you are finished, you will be taken to the Listing Page

Step 4: Complete the Listing Page

Fill out and Complete all the fields provided. Fields that are optional are indicated. Basic Information: Give us some basic info about your space.

Overview:

Pick a title for your property create a description. If you want to provide more information to your guests/customers, you can click ‘add more details’ and tell us more.

Calendar:

Pick when your listing will be available- Always, Sometimes, One-time.

Price:

Pick your currency and choose the price for your property for a day, and a week or month if you’re planning to rent out for longer periods of time.

Photos and Videos:

Upload High-Definition pictures of your property for everyone to see. Also, you can embed a youtube video to give your viewers something more to look at.

Amenities:

Pick and choose what types of amenities will be provided.

Location:

Provide your address so that users can locate your property.

Complete Profile:

If you haven't already completed the necessary fields for your user profile, fill out the information here before you can post the listing.

Preview/Complete:

Once you are finished, preview your listing and push ‘Complete’ when you are satisfied. You can push the ‘Edit’ button to go back and make revisions before completion.

Step 5: Your Listing is up!

After you complete the listing page, you will be taken to the Confirmation Page. From here you can choose to create another listing or go to your dashboard.


All the reviews on Guesthouser are written by hosts and travelers from our community, so any review you see is based on a completed stay that a guest had in a host’s listing.




Writing a review

To leave a review for a recent trip, click on the reminder in the Alerts section of your dashboard, or go to Edit Profile > Reviews > Reviews By You**. They are limited to 500 words and must follow Guesthouser's review guidelines. It's important that you don't leave personally identifiable information in a review, like a person's last name or address.




Editing a review

After writing a review, if your host or guest didn't complete their review yet, you can edit your review for up to 48 hours, or until your host or guest completes their review. You can edit a review at Edit Profile > Reviews > Reviews by You > Edit**.




Previous reviews

To see your review history, go to Edit Profile > Reviews**. You'll see past Reviews About You and Reviews By You. Among the Reviews About You, you'll also see any Private Feedback that people have left you. This is also where you can also leave a public response to a review you've received within the past 2 weeks.




Star ratings

In addition to written reviews, the guests who stay in a listing can submit a primary star rating and a set of category star ratings. The number of stars displayed at the top of a listing page is an aggregate of the primary scores guests have given for that listing. At the bottom of a listing page there's an aggeregate for each category rating. A host needs to receive star ratings from at least 3 guests before their aggregate score appears.

Our community relies on honest, transparent reviews. We will remove or alter a review if we find that it violates our review guidelines.

**[true schematics to be decided]




New York City Laws


What laws apply to me as a host in New York?


While we do not provide legal advice, we want to provide this non-exhaustive information to help you. Laws that may apply to hosts in New York include:



The New York State Multiple Dwelling Law. If your listing is in a single-family home or two- family buildings, this law restricting uses of “Class A” buildings does not apply to you. If you live in most apartment buildings in New York (ex: a building with three or more apartments), this law makes it illegal to host paying guests for less than 30 days unless a permanent resident of the apartment (like the host or the host’s roommate) also stays in the apartment during the guest’s stay.



Taxes. New York City and New York State impose multiple taxes that may apply to temporary guests (which the laws call “transient occupancy”) or tourist use, with some exemptions. Examples of taxes that could apply to your listing are state sales and use tax, City hotel room occupancy tax, and State and City room fees. You can get information about hotel sales taxes and about NYC hotel occupancy taxes. The word “hotel” has a broad definition that could apply to you.



Rent Regulation. Extra rules apply to rent stabilized and rent control properties. If you live in a rent-controlled property, you may be prohibited from subleasing your apartment. If you live in a rent-stabilized property, laws may restrict subleasing, the amounts you can sublease, or require advance notice to your landlord. Financial penalties, eviction or other remedies could apply. New York City Zoning Code. The New York City Zoning Code has zoning regulations that may apply to your property.



Business Licensing. The New York City Administrative Code requires certain businesses to obtain a license. You should look at these requirements to find out if you need a license to host. Learn how to start a business.



Other Rules. Other rules and regulations may apply to hosting, such as contracts you have with third parties like your lease, HOA rules, Housing Cooperative documents, and Condominium agreements.



We recommend you consult a local lawyer or tax professional to help you fully understand these laws. If you have questions about what laws may apply to you, you can contact the Department of Buildings , Department of Finance, or other city agencies directly.




We encourage hosts to think carefully about their responsibilities. Hosting offers rich experiences, but it comes with a certain level of commitment. In addition to the Hospitality Standards, here are some ways you can be a responsible host.




Safety

What can I do to make my space safe for guests?


Emergency Procedures

Contact Info: Indicate local emergency numbers and the nearest hospital. Provide a clear emergency contact number for yourself, as well as backup, for easy guest reference. Also make clear how you should be contacted if the guest has questions or issues arise.



Supplies: Make a first aid kit easily available.



Fire Prevention: Ensure you have a functioning smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector, and that your property meets government safety guidelines for your area (e.g., International Building Code). Ensure you provide a functioning fire extinguisher and complete required maintenance.



Exits: Ensure you have a clearly marked fire escape route, and post a map in your home.




Minimize Hazards

Privacy:Always be mindful of your guests' privacy. Fully disclose whether there are security cameras or other surveillance equipment at or around your listing. Make sure you are aware of and comply with applicable federal, state, and local laws.



Occupancy: Establish safe occupancy limits - your local government may have guidelines.



Access: Go through your home to identify any areas where guests might trip or fall and either remove the hazard or mark clearly. Fix any exposed wires. Ensure stairs are safe and have railings. Remove or lock up any objects that may be dangerous to your guests.



Child-Proofing: Ensure your home is safe for children, or else notify guests of potential hazards.



Climate: Ensure your home is properly ventilated and that temperature control is clearly marked and functional. Ensure guests are clear about how to safely use the heater.




Neighbors

How can I be mindful of my neighbors?


Contact Info: Indicate local emergency numbers and the nearest hospital. Provide a clear emergency contact number for yourself, as well as backup, for easy guest reference. Also make clear how you should be contacted if the guest has questions or issues arise.



Supplies: Make a first aid kit easily available.



Fire Prevention: Ensure you have a functioning smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector, and that your property meets government safety guidelines for your area (e.g., International Building Code). Ensure you provide a functioning fire extinguisher and complete required maintenance.



Exits: Ensure you have a clearly marked fire escape route, and post a map in your home.



Privacy: Always be mindful of your guests' privacy. Fully disclose whether there are security cameras or other surveillance equipment at or around your listing. Make sure you are aware of and comply with applicable federal, state, and local laws.



Occupancy: Establish safe occupancy limits - your local government may have guidelines.



Access: Go through your home to identify any areas where guests might trip or fall and either remove the hazard or mark clearly. Fix any exposed wires. Ensure stairs are safe and have railings. Remove or lock up any objects that may be dangerous to your guests.



Child-Proofing: Ensure your home is safe for children, or else notify guests of potential hazards.



Climate: Ensure your home is properly ventilated and that temperature control is clearly marked and functional. Ensure guests are clear about how to safely use the heater.



Building Rules: Ensure you relay your building's common area rules to your guest. You may want to even notify your neighbors that you will have guests, and remind guests not to bother your neighbors (e.g., don't knock on their door or buzz them to let you in).



Smoking: If you don't allow smoking, we suggest posting signs to remind guests. If you do allow smoking, ensure you have ashtrays available in designated areas.



Parking: Ensure you relay parking rules for your building and neighborhood to your guest.



Noise: Remind guests about keeping noise down. You may want to consider whether you allow babies, pets, or parties. Develop a policy about guests inviting other people over, and ensure your guests are clear about your 'party policy.'



Pets: If you allow pets, ensure guests are educated about things like local parks and local customs (e.g., cleaning up after your dog). Have a backup plan in case a guest's pet upsets the neighbors (such as the number of a nearby pet hotel).



House Rules: To avoid surprises, you may want to include the information covered above in your House Rules in your GuestHouser listing profile.




Permissions

Whom should I notify that I'm hosting on GuestHouser?


Contracts: Check your HOA or Co-Op Board regulations to make sure there is no prohibition against subletting--or any other restriction against hosting. Read your lease agreement and check with your landlord if applicable. You may consider adding a rider to your contract that addresses the concerns of these parties and outlines the responsibilities and liabilities of all parties.



Roommates: If you have roommates, consider a roommate agreement in writing which outlines things like how often you plan to host, how you'll ensure guests follow House Rules, and even whether you'll share revenue if that makes sense for you.



Neighbors: Consider whether you should notify your neighbors about your plans to host, along with your plan for how to make sure your guests are not disruptive.



Subsidized Housing: If you live in public or subsidized housing there may be special rules that apply to you. The manager of the property may be able to answer questions about this.




General Regulations

What local regulations apply to me?


Taxes: Ensure you look up any local taxes or business license requirements that may apply. This may include things like hotel/transient occupancy tax, sales, and other turnover taxes such as Value Added Tax (VAT) or Goods and Services Tax (GST), or income tax.



Permits or Registrations: Ensure you look up any permitting, zoning, safety, and health regulations that may apply. The governing authorities that regulate the use and development of property in your area may have useful information on such regulations.



Rent Control/Rent Stabilization: If you live in rent controlled or stabilized housing, there may be special rules that apply to you. Contact your local Rent board to ask questions about this topic.




Offline Payment Requests


Why should I only pay and communicate through Guesthouser?

What if someone asks to arrange payment through email or off the Guesthouser website? While the vast majority of our transactions are incident-free, it's good to know what to look for to avoid any potential payment scams.

All legitimate payments on Guesthouser take place through our website. If someone messages you on Guesthouser and asks you to contact them off-site to arrange payment details, please do not attempt to communicate or pay off-site. You can report people who ask you to do this by flagging the message—just look for the small flag icon in your message thread: If a guest or host contacts you after a booking request has been completed to discuss refunds or discounts in person contact Guesthouser right away. This is not allowed or approved by guesthouser.com and violates the user agreement between host and Guesthouser and traveller and Guesthouser.

We will never ask you to pay through your email. If you receive a personal email from anyone (including an automated@Guesthouser.com or any other username@Guesthouser.com email address) asking you to pay or accept payment off-site, immediately report it to safety@Guesthouser.com and end communication with the sender.

You should not receive a paper or PDF invoice from a host or from Guesthouser asking you for payment. Any of the following key words and similar terms should be immediately flagged or avoided: Western Union, MoneyGram, cashier’s check, money order, Liberty Reserve.

Paying and communicating only through the Guesthouser platform is vital to making your experience as positive and secure as possible. If your transaction happens offline and we have no record of it, it is almost impossible for us to assist you. Learn more about our payment system so you understand how it works.

To keep your account secure, be cautious of strange links in messages from other users, even ones you know, as their accounts may have been compromised. If you suspect that you have received a "phishing" message, immediately report it to safety@Guesthouser.com and end communication with the sender.

We also recommend you take advantage of verifications and other features we've made with your safety and trust in mind.


Pay and Communicate through Guesthouser


Why should I pay and communicate only through Guesthouser?

Guesthouser is a new way of doing business in an age-old industry. The vacation rental industry has always been vulnerable to risks and uncertainty. Guesthouser’s system is designed to give you peace of mind. Paying and communicating only through the Guesthouser platform is vital to making your experience as positive and secure as possible.

When you book through Guesthouser, payments go through our secure structure and are not released to the other party until after the reservation has begun. Guesthouser also provides private messaging for guests and hosts, profile verifications so you can learn more about who you’re transacting with, and the ability to flag content that may be suspicious.

By conducting your transactions on the site, you also have access to:

  • Our 24/7 customer service team.

  • The opportunity to review and be reviewed after your complete reservations.

  • An amazing community of like-minded people traveling, hosting, and reviewing listings on a nightly basis.

Hosts also enjoy:


  • A cancellation policy for your listing, enabling you to receive a partial or full payout in the event of a guest cancellation.

  • The comfort of the Guesthouser Host Guarantee

Guests also enjoy:


  • The safety of your funds in the event of a host cancellation.

  • The support of our Guest Refund Policy.

Paying outside the Guesthouser system is not secure, and we cannot provide access to these benefits when reservations aren’t booked directly through our website. If someone asks you to pay outside of Guesthouser, please report it to safety@Guesthouser.com immediately. Read more information here.


How do taxes work for hosts?
Local Tax

Your state or locality may impose a tax on the rental of rooms. In many places this is known as a occupancy tax, but may also be known as a lodging tax, a room tax, a use tax, a tourist tax, or hotel tax. We expect all hosts to familiarize themselves with and follow their local laws and regulations.
If you determine that you need to collect tax, you may either incorporate it into your nightly price, add it via a Special Offer, or ask your guests to pay it in person. In each case, it's important that guests are informed of the exact tax amount prior to booking.
If you choose to collect tax outside of your listing's rates, please note that it should be collected only upon arrival and that we are unable to assist with collection.
In some locations, Guesthouser has made agreements with government officials to collect and remit local taxes on behalf of hosts, making the tax collection process easier for all parties involved. For Guesthouser listings in these areas, applicable local taxes are calculated and collected at the time of booking. This won't affect the payouts you receive for reservations. As a host, you'll continue to collect your payout of accommodation fees minus Guesthouser service fees, just as you do today.
We're dedicated to keeping your personal information private—if at any point we're required to share any information with your local government, you'll be specifically notified of the needed disclosures.



Value Added Tax

If your country of residence is part of the European Union, you may need to assess Value Added Tax (VAT) on the services you provide. We encourage you to consult a tax advisor in your area for more insight on this and assistance assessing VAT on the services you provide if necessary. Additionally, Guesthouser is required to collect VAT on its service fees in countries that tax Electronically Supplied Services. Currently, that includes all countries in the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, and South Africa.



US Income Taxes

As a host, your gross earnings may be subject to US income taxes. To assist with US tax compliance, we collect taxpayer information from hosts in order to provide an account of their earnings each year. Even if you're not a US taxpayer, we may still require certain information from you. Learn more about why Guesthouser may request your taxpayer information.



To add your taxpayer information, go to your Payout Preferences and complete the appropriate form.

US persons may fill out a W-9 form. At the end of January, we'll provide hosts who've submitted a W-9 with a Form 1099-K showing their reportable earnings from the previous year. The IRS definition of US persons includes domestic corporations. Learn more about US tax classifications.

Non-US persons who have a Taxpayer Identification Number (either a Social Security Number or Employer Identification Number) may fill out a W-8ECI form. We'll provide hosts who submit a W-8ECI with a 1042-S form showing any US sourced earnings that they have. Non-US persons who do not have a Taxpayer Identification Number may fill out a W-8BEN form to certify their foreign status. We'll provide hosts who have submitted a W-8BEN with a Form 1042-S reporting any US sourced earnings. Unless valid tax treaty benefits have been claimed, Guesthouser is also required to withhold 30% on all payouts from US listings hosted by non-US persons.

If you're unsure of which form to submit, we encourage you to consult a tax professional who can clarify your tax status. If you've received a request to submit your taxpayer information and haven't yet provided it, we may be required to withhold a percentage of your earnings. We expect all hosts to comply with the tax regulations in their area.

Where’s my 2014 tax form?

Most hosts will receive a Form 1099 at the end of January. We’ll send out a dashboard alert when it’s ready. Once it’s uploaded, you’ll be able to access a PDF of your tax form at the bottom of your Payout Preferences page. Just click the red hyperlinked text under E-Statement. If you’ve opted to receive your form by mail as well, please expect it to arrive by mid-February. For the small number of hosts who will receive a Form 1042-S instead, it will be available online by the end of March.


What address will you mail my tax form to?

If you opted to also receive a tax form by mail, we’ll send it to the address you entered when submitting taxpayer information. To see that address, visit Payout Preferences. In the Taxpayer Information section, click Options and select Edit next to the taxpayer name.


What type of tax form will I receive?

It depends on the taxpayer information you submitted. Generally, hosts who submitted a W-9 will get a 1099-K. Service providers who submitted a W-9 and earned more than $600 in 2014 will get a 1099-Misc. If you’re a non-US person who submitted a W-8ECI, or have US earnings and completed a W-8BEN, you’ll receive a 1042-S.


How are fees, refunds, and other adjustments represented in my 1099-K?

The IRS requires that we calculate the amount for your 1099-K filing based on your gross volume. This means that we won't net out any fees, refunds, or other amounts. This includes adjustments for:

  • Host fees

  • Disputed charges• Refunded transactions

  • Refunded transactions

  • Other adjustments to your account


Why is the amount on my tax form higher than the amount I see in my Transaction History?

IRS rules require Guesthouser to report gross earnings, which includes the 3% host fee. In other words, the tax form reflects the price you set for guests (e.g., $100/night vs the $97 payout you received, after the Guesthouser host fee).


How can I correct an error on my tax form?

We are no longer accommodating changes to taxpayer information or assignments for the 2014 tax reporting year. Any changes to tax information made now will be reflected on your 2015 tax form.


What expenses can I deduct on my tax return?

Guesthouser isn't able to offer tax advice. We encourage you to consult a tax professional or the IRS website if you have any questions. Can I import my 1099 directly into Turbo Tax®, H&R Block®, or TaxACT®? Regrettably, we do not have this feature.

Why is Guesthouser requesting my taxpayer information?

As a US company, we’re required by US law to collect taxpayer information from hosts who appear to have US-sourced income. To add your taxpayer information, go to your Payout Preferences and complete the appropriate form. It only takes a minute or two!

Even if you're not a US person and have no US listings, we may be required to collect certain documentation from you to find out if your earnings through Guesthouser are not subject to US tax.

Depending on your tax status, we’ll provide you with a tax form showing your earnings for the year.

Whether or not you receive a form from us, it remains your responsibility to determine what amount to report as taxable income on your US Income tax return. We encourage you to consult
a tax professional if you need advice on reporting your income. One resource for information on
reporting rental income in the US is IRS publication 527: Residential Rental Property.

Why are taxes being withheld from my payouts?

If you received a request to submit your taxpayer information and haven’t yet provided it, we are required to withhold 28% from your payouts and remit the withholdings to the Internal Revenue Service in Washington, DC. You can avoid this by submitting your taxpayer information.

Once we receive your information, we won’t withhold from your future payouts. However, any amounts that have already been withheld and remitted to the IRS cannot be returned to you by Guesthouser.

The total amount withheld will be included on any tax forms issued to you so that you may account for these withholdings on your income tax return. We encourage you to consult a tax advisor if you need assistance accounting for any withholdings that have been remitted to the IRS on your behalf.
W8-BEN Taxpayers (Non-US persons with US listings)

Unless valid tax treaty benefits have been claimed on your W-8BEN, Guesthouser is required to withhold 30% on all payouts from US listings hosted by non-US persons and remit the funds directly to the IRS. At the end of the year, Guesthouser will report the total amount withheld and earnings to you on a Form 1042-S.

You may review or revise your Guesthouser taxpayer information in your Payout Preferences

How do I split income between multiple people for tax purposes?

For income to be divided between multiple people, you'll need to make sure that each person is paid directly through Guesthouser with a separate payout method. Then, you can assign a taxpayer to each payout method in your account. From your Payout Preferences:

  • 1. Click your name in the top-right corner of Guesthouser.com and select Account

  • 2. Click Payment Preferences in the left sidebar

  • 3. Add a payout method for each individual or entity who receives earnings from your account.

  • 4. Use payout routing rules to direct payouts by listing, or split payouts between two payout methods.

  • 5. Add tax information for each individual or entity.

  • 6. Assign each payout method to the appropriate taxpayer by clicking Options to the right of the payout method and selecting Assign Taxpayer. A drop-down menu will appear for you to select the correct taxpayer.


Keep in mind that only one taxpayer can be assigned to each payout method. New payout methods and those that have not been assigned to a specific taxpayer are assigned to the default taxpayer. You can set the default taxpayer from the Options menu next to the taxpayer at the bottom of your payout preferences.

What amounts are included on my tax form?

We're required by the IRS to report gross account transactions on tax forms. For each reservation, the gross amount is the price agreed upon before Guesthouser service fees. Any refunds in the form of adjustments that took place after your initial payout for the reservation are not netted out of the gross amount displayed on your form.

If you received payouts for purposes other than a reservation, or sent payouts to a charity, they may be included in the gross earnings shown on your form as well.

To reconcile your gross earnings:

  • 1. From your computer, head to Booking History

  • 2. At the top, click Gross Earnings

  • 3. At the top left, select the correct year

  • 4. From the top right, export your transaction history as a CSV file by clicking Export to CSV


The CSV file can be opened by any standard spreadsheet program (like Microsoft Excel, Google Docs, or Apple Numbers) to give you a display of the data. Once open, filter the Type column (column B) to only show Reservations. The sum of the Gross Earnings column (column O) should reconcile to the amount reported on your Form 1099-K.

While we are required to report gross income on your form, it remains your responsibility to determine what, from your total amount earned, to report as taxable income on your US Income tax return. We encourage you to consult a tax advisor if you need assistance deducting any non- taxable income from your taxes.

How do I change my taxpayer information?

To update your taxpayer information:

  • 1 Log into Guesthouser.com from your desktop computer

  • 2 Click your name in the top-right corner

  • 3 Select Account

  • 4 From the menu on the left, select Payout Preferences

  • 5 To the right of your Taxpayer Information, click Options

  • 6 Select Edit


Don't forget to click Submit after making any changes, and you're all set! Some fields aren't editable, so if you're trying to change your tax ID number, tax classification, or enter a different taxpayer entirely, please add a new taxpayer.
Changes made after December 15th, 2014 will be applied to the 2015 tax year.

How can I correct an error on my 1099 form?

You can edit your taxpayer information or change the way your earnings are assigned between multiple taxpayers from your Payout Preferences. Changes made after December 15th, 2014 will be applied to the 2015 tax year.

If you are noticing a discrepancy between the earnings shown on your tax form and the earnings shown in your Transaction History, or your form shows a higher amount than you were expecting, the reason is likely due to the fact that we are required to print gross earnings (inclusive of our 3% host fee) on your form. You can also read more about what amounts are included on your tax form.

What tax forms should I expect to receive from Guesthouser?I get my payouts through PayPal. Does Guesthouser report these earnings?

Hosts who have filled out a W-9 form will receive form 1099-K showing their earnings for the year, and hosts with US sourced earnings who have filled out a W-8 form will be provided form 1042-S. If you did not receive a tax form, please make sure to review to see if you should expect a form. If you think you've submitted the wrong information, you can also make changes to taxpayer information you've already submitted.

1099 Forms

  • Delivery. Any 1099 forms we issue to you will be available in your Payout Preferences. You'll receive an email notification when your form is ready, typically in late January of each year. We also mail a copy to the address you provided along with your taxpayer information, unless you opted for electronic delivery only.

  • Receiving multiple 1099s. You may receive both a 1099-K and a 1099-MISC form if you are both a host and an Guesthouser service provider. You may also receive more than one 1099-K form if your taxpayer information is listed on multiple Guesthouser accounts.

  • 1099-K. In previous years, we issued 1099-MISC forms to hosts. Starting with the 2013 tax year, we're sending 1099-K forms instead. This shouldn't change the way you file your taxes. As always, we encourage you to consult a tax professional for assistance reporting your income.


1042-S Forms

  • Delivery. The IRS requires that we mail 1042-S forms by the end of March. You'll receive a 1042-S form in the mail at the address you entered when you submitted your tax information.

I get my payouts through PayPal. Does Guesthouser report these earnings?

Guesthouser reports PayPal earnings in the United States only. As of 2013, we report all earnings on the 1099 forms we send to US hosts regardless of what payout method you use. PayPal has agreed to omit Guesthouser payouts from any tax forms they provide you for 2013 to avoid double reporting of Guesthouser income.

What local taxes apply to my listing and how do I collect them?

Your state or locality may impose a tax on the rental of rooms. In many places this is known as an occupancy tax, but may also be known as a room tax, a use tax, a tourist tax, or hotel tax. We expect all hosts to familiarize themselves with and follow their local laws and regulations. Hosts who determine they need to collect such a tax may either incorporate it into their nightly price, add it via a Special Offer, or ask their guests to pay it in person. In each case, it's important that guests are informed of the exact tax amount prior to booking.

In some locations, Guesthouser has made agreements with government officials to collect and remit local taxes on your behalf. This doesn’t change which taxes are due, but it does simplify and automate the process for Guesthouser reservations. If you have been alerted that your listing is in one of these areas, Guesthouser will calculate the tax, charge the guest, and remit the tax on your behalf.

Currently, Guesthouser is collecting and remitting taxes in the following locations: Multnomah County and Portland, Oregon USA
Guests who book Guesthouser listings that are located in the State of Oregon, Multnomah County and/or the City of Portland will pay the following taxes as part of their reservation:

  • Oregon Transient Lodging Tax: 1% of the listing price including any cleaning fee for reservations 30 nights and shorter. 1% is the State imposed tax rate only. For detailed information, visit Oregon.gov.

  • Multnomah County Transient Lodging Tax: 11.5% of the listing price including any cleaning fee for reservations 30 nights and shorter. 11.5% is the maximum Transient Lodging Tax for listings in Multnomah County (excluding the State level tax). For example, for Portland listings that are also located in Multnomah County, the Portland Transient Lodging Tax is 6% and the Multnomah County Transient Lodging Tax is 5.5%. For detailed information, visit PortlandOregon.gov.

  • Portland Transient Lodging Tax: 6% of the listing price including any cleaning fee for reservations 30 nights and shorter



San Francisco, CA USA
Guests who book Guesthouser listings that are located in San Francisco, CA will pay the following taxes as part of their reservation:

  • San Francisco Transient Occupancy Tax: 14% of the listing price including any cleaning fee for reservations 29 nights and shorter. 14% is the tax rate imposed by the City and County of San Francisco (the tax jurisdictions are one and the same). For detailed information, visit SFtreasurer.org.



Amsterdam, NL
Starting February 1, 2015, guests who book Guesthouser listings that are located in the City of Amsterdam, NL will pay the following taxes as part of their reservation:

  • Amsterdam Tourist Tax: 5% of the listing price including any cleaning fee. 5% is the tax rate imposed by the City of Amsterdam as of 1/1/2015. For detailed information, visit Amsterdam’s government website.



San Jose, CA USA
Starting February 1, 2015, guests who book Guesthouser listings that are located in San Jose, CA will pay the following taxes as part of their reservation:

  • San Jose Transient Occupancy Tax: 10% of the listing price including any cleaning fee for reservations 30 nights and shorter. For detailed information, visit SanJoseCa.gov.



Chicago, IL USA
Starting February 15, 2015, guests who book Guesthouser listings that are located in Chicago, IL will pay the following taxes as part of their reservation:

  • Chicago Hotel Accommodation Tax: 4.5% of the listing price including any cleaning fee for reservations 29 nights and shorter. For detailed information, visit CityofChicago.org.



District of Columbia USA
Starting February 15, 2015, guests who book Guesthouser listings that are located in the District of Columbia will pay the following taxes as part of their reservation:

  • DC Sales Tax on Hotels (transient accommodations): 14.5% of the listing price including any cleaning fee for reservations 90 nights and shorter. For detailed information, visit DC.gov.



Hosts located in these areas are responsible for assessing all other tax obligations, including state and city jurisdictions.

Who’s responsible for paying local taxes?

Hosts are responsible for following all laws and regulations, including paying any local taxes that apply to their accommodations.

If a listing is in an area where Guesthouser remits occupancy taxes on behalf of hosts, the tax is calculated and collected from guests at the time of booking, with no action needed from the host. The tax will be listed as a line item on all guest receipts, and shown within hosts’ Transaction History.

If you are a host whose listing is in an area where we are not currently remitting taxes on your behalf, read more about collecting local taxes.

Hosts who determine they need to collect such a tax may either incorporate it into their nightly price, add it via a Special Offer, or ask their guests to pay it in person. In each case, it's important that guests are informed of the exact tax amount prior to booking.

The taxes that are due vary by country, state, county and city. We understand that many of these rules are complex and difficult to follow. Guesthouser wants to help hosts follow the laws relevant to them, and is facilitating the collection and remittance guests on behalf of hosts in certain areas.

We'll continue to work with governments in other locations to explore ways to help facilitate tax collection. We're looking forward to continuing to partner with our community and neighborhoods to enrich the cities we all share.

Guesthouser is collecting incorrect local taxes for my listing. What should I do?

Guesthouser is only collecting taxes on behalf of hosts wherever we've collaborated with the local government and reached a signed agreement. This may include taxes from a city, county, state, tax jurisdiction, or a combination of these areas. If your listing is exempt from occupancy taxes by law or is in a tax exempt area, Guesthouser will not collect occupancy tax on reservations.

Occupancy taxes are calculated differently in every jurisdiction. There may be a percent based tax calculated from the price of a reservation; there may also be a per night tax, per person tax, or per person/per night tax.

If you believe that Guesthouser is collecting incorrect local taxes for your listing, contact us.

What is VAT and how does it apply to me?

Valued added tax, or VAT, is a tax assessed on the supply of goods and services. Guesthouser charges VAT on its service fees for users from the European Union, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, and South Africa.



Guests

VAT is charged at the time of payment and is based on the total guest fee for a reservation. If 1 you alter your reservation, VAT adjusts to reflect any change in the service fee. For reservations booked between May 1, 2014 and December 31, 2014, Guesthouser will calculate VAT based on the Irish VAT rate of 23% for all guests in the EU, regardless of country of residence. This change is related to Guesthouser’s new international headquarters in Dublin. On January 1, 2015, a new EU tax law takes effect. At this time, Guesthouser will go back to calculating VAT according to the rate in guests' local country of residence, based on the selection when you enter payment information.



Hosts

VAT is deducted from your payout and is based on total host fee for a reservation. If you alter your reservation, VAT adjusts to reflect any change in the service fee. For reservations booked between May 1, 2014 and December 31, 2014, Guesthouser will calculate VAT based on the Irish VAT rate of 23% for all hosts in the EU, regardless of country of residence. This change is related to Guesthouser’s new international headquarters in Dublin. On January 1, 2015, a new EU tax law takes effect. At this time, Guesthouser will go back to calculating VAT according to the rate in hosts’ local country of residence, based on the selection when you add a payout method.

Where can I find my VAT invoice?

Your VAT invoices can be found in the same place as your guest billing receipt or host confirmation on the desktop version of Guesthouser.
A VAT invoice is provided whenever VAT is assessed on Guesthouser service fees. An invoice is finalized and issued when a reservation is accepted, and includes your information (name, address, etc) as you entered it in your Guesthouser account. Guesthouser is not able to modify a VAT invoice after it's been issued.

If you add a verified VAT ID number to your account, this will be included on VAT invoices created after the addition. If you'll need additional documentation for travel, we encourage you to communicate with your host` before booking to see if they're able to assist you. For reservation details, reference your billing receipt or host confirmation.

How can I provide my VAT ID number?

If you’re a host operating as a business or a guest paying with an employer’s payment method, and you have a VAT ID number registered with the EU, you may enter your VAT ID number in your profile. If your VAT ID number can be verified by the European Commission, you won’t be charged VAT on our service fees and it will be your responsibility to self-assess whether you need to pay VAT for the use of our services. Please see the VIES website for a list of proper formats for VAT ID numbers by member state.


How do I create an account?

Click sign up on the top-bar menu and a pop-up will appear with a form for you to fill out. You can either sign up using your email address or through your Facebook account.

How do I login?

Click the login button on the top-bar menu and a pop-up will appear that will prompt you to login with either your email address and password, or with your Facebook account.

How do I list my property?

Click the orange List Your Space button on the top-right of the top-bar menu and follow the instructions.

How do I view my listings?

To view your listings, hover your mouse over the button of the top-bar menu that says “Hello, (your username)” and select Manage Listings. This will take you to the Manage Listings tab of your dashboard.

How do I edit my listings?

On the Manage Listings page, click the edit button for the property that you wish to edit. This will take you back to the listing page for you to change details

How do I delete a listing?

On the Manage Listing's page, click the delete button for the property that you wish to delete. A pop-up will then appear verifying whether or not you wish to delete the listing; click yes to continue, or click no to go back.

Does it cost money to list my property?

Absolutely not! Users can post a listing at no cost; in fact, GuestHouser provides free listing, and more, by also including free marketing for all our hosts and premium services to our top performers.

When can I start booking customers?

We are currently in beta for our website which only includes listing properties. Very soon, GuestHouser will launch with all our listings for an international consumer-base. We will also be giving regular updates about our site progress via email so you will always be kept in the loop. In the meantime, thank you for your patience, and we are excited to have you with us.

I want to speak to someone on the phone.

You can view our Contact page to find our contact email and customer service line. If you have been contacted over the phone or email to list with GuestHouser, call the sales representative whose information was provided and they will answer all of your inquiries.



1. Create a Listing.

Create a listing for your property at no cost to you. Start by clicking the 'Become a Host' button at the top-right hand corner of every page to take you to the listing process. Simply follow the steps that take you through the process of filling out details, picking availability, and uploading photos and videos for your listing. At any point during the process, you can use the 'Back' button to make edits to previous sections, and to move forward, click the 'Next' button until you've filled out all the necessary portions and are ready to review and submit.

2. Get Connected.

Once your listing is live, it'll be made available for all GuestHouser users to search and book. We provide our users, both hosts and guests, with a portal where they can communicate and ultimately rent out rooms after proper discourse. Our site gives you plenty of feedback on the customer with our customer rating system that shows information on previous stays, so you'll never have to rent out your property without any feedback.

3. Book It!

Great, now that you've come to an agreement with a guest, you can now respond and choose to rent out the room. After receiving a request to book, you have a 24-hour period to respond by either verifying or declining. It is important to respond to these requests promptly, as late responses that go past the 24-hour period, or no response at all, will negatively affect your listing score and your search results.

4. Time to Host!!

Now you're ready to for the fun part: welcoming your guests and receiving payment; but, there are a few more things to complete the process. Make sure to coordinate with yours guests, prepare for their arrival, set-up check-in, and don't forget to review your customers to improve your accounts rating.



Step 1: Click the Green 'Become a Host' button

To begin, simply click the Green 'Become a Host' button located at the top-right of the top-bar menu. Once you click this button, you will be prompted to the next page

Step 2: Fill Out the Listing Pre-form page

Now, complete the four necessary fields on this page- Property Type, Room Type, Accommodates, and City. Once you have completed all fields, push next.

Step 3: Login/Sign Up If Necessary

After you push next, if you are not already logged in as a user, you will be prompted to login or sign up for the site. If you already have an account, login using your email or your facebook account; and if you’re signing up for the first time, you can do so by using your email address or your facebook account. Once you are finished, you will be taken to the Listing Page

Step 4: Complete the Listing Page

Fill out and Complete all the fields provided. Fields that are optional are indicated. Basic Information: Give us some basic info about your space.

Overview:

Pick a title for your property create a description. If you want to provide more information to your guests/customers, you can click ‘add more details’ and tell us more.

Calendar:

Pick when your listing will be available- Always, Sometimes, One-time.

Price:

Pick your currency and choose the price for your property for a day, and a week or month if you’re planning to rent out for longer periods of time.

Photos and Videos:

Upload High-Definition pictures of your property for everyone to see. Also, you can embed a youtube video to give your viewers something more to look at.

Amenities:

Pick and choose what types of amenities will be provided.

Location:

Provide your address so that users can locate your property.

Complete Profile:

If you haven't already completed the necessary fields for your user profile, fill out the information here before you can post the listing.

Preview/Complete:

Once you are finished, preview your listing and push ‘Complete’ when you are satisfied. You can push the ‘Edit’ button to go back and make revisions before completion.

Step 5: Your Listing is up!

After you complete the listing page, you will be taken to the Confirmation Page. From here you can choose to create another listing or go to your dashboard.



We encourage hosts to think carefully about their responsibilities. Hosting offers rich experiences, but it comes with a certain level of commitment. In addition to the Hospitality Standards, here are some ways you can be a responsible host.




Safety

What can I do to make my space safe for guests?


Emergency Procedures

Contact Info: Indicate local emergency numbers and the nearest hospital. Provide a clear emergency contact number for yourself, as well as backup, for easy guest reference. Also make clear how you should be contacted if the guest has questions or issues arise.



Supplies: Make a first aid kit easily available.



Fire Prevention: Ensure you have a functioning smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector, and that your property meets government safety guidelines for your area (e.g., International Building Code). Ensure you provide a functioning fire extinguisher and complete required maintenance.



Exits: Ensure you have a clearly marked fire escape route, and post a map in your home.




Minimize Hazards

Privacy:Always be mindful of your guests' privacy. Fully disclose whether there are security cameras or other surveillance equipment at or around your listing. Make sure you are aware of and comply with applicable federal, state, and local laws.



Occupancy: Establish safe occupancy limits - your local government may have guidelines.



Access: Go through your home to identify any areas where guests might trip or fall and either remove the hazard or mark clearly. Fix any exposed wires. Ensure stairs are safe and have railings. Remove or lock up any objects that may be dangerous to your guests.



Child-Proofing: Ensure your home is safe for children, or else notify guests of potential hazards.



Climate: Ensure your home is properly ventilated and that temperature control is clearly marked and functional. Ensure guests are clear about how to safely use the heater.




Neighbors

How can I be mindful of my neighbors?


Contact Info: Indicate local emergency numbers and the nearest hospital. Provide a clear emergency contact number for yourself, as well as backup, for easy guest reference. Also make clear how you should be contacted if the guest has questions or issues arise.



Supplies: Make a first aid kit easily available.



Fire Prevention: Ensure you have a functioning smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector, and that your property meets government safety guidelines for your area (e.g., International Building Code). Ensure you provide a functioning fire extinguisher and complete required maintenance.



Exits: Ensure you have a clearly marked fire escape route, and post a map in your home.



Privacy: Always be mindful of your guests' privacy. Fully disclose whether there are security cameras or other surveillance equipment at or around your listing. Make sure you are aware of and comply with applicable federal, state, and local laws.



Occupancy: Establish safe occupancy limits - your local government may have guidelines.



Access: Go through your home to identify any areas where guests might trip or fall and either remove the hazard or mark clearly. Fix any exposed wires. Ensure stairs are safe and have railings. Remove or lock up any objects that may be dangerous to your guests.



Child-Proofing: Ensure your home is safe for children, or else notify guests of potential hazards.



Climate: Ensure your home is properly ventilated and that temperature control is clearly marked and functional. Ensure guests are clear about how to safely use the heater.



Building Rules: Ensure you relay your building's common area rules to your guest. You may want to even notify your neighbors that you will have guests, and remind guests not to bother your neighbors (e.g., don't knock on their door or buzz them to let you in).



Smoking: If you don't allow smoking, we suggest posting signs to remind guests. If you do allow smoking, ensure you have ashtrays available in designated areas.



Parking: Ensure you relay parking rules for your building and neighborhood to your guest.



Noise: Remind guests about keeping noise down. You may want to consider whether you allow babies, pets, or parties. Develop a policy about guests inviting other people over, and ensure your guests are clear about your 'party policy.'



Pets: If you allow pets, ensure guests are educated about things like local parks and local customs (e.g., cleaning up after your dog). Have a backup plan in case a guest's pet upsets the neighbors (such as the number of a nearby pet hotel).



House Rules: To avoid surprises, you may want to include the information covered above in your House Rules in your GuestHouser listing profile.




Permissions

Whom should I notify that I'm hosting on GuestHouser?


Contracts: Check your HOA or Co-Op Board regulations to make sure there is no prohibition against subletting--or any other restriction against hosting. Read your lease agreement and check with your landlord if applicable. You may consider adding a rider to your contract that addresses the concerns of these parties and outlines the responsibilities and liabilities of all parties.



Roommates: If you have roommates, consider a roommate agreement in writing which outlines things like how often you plan to host, how you'll ensure guests follow House Rules, and even whether you'll share revenue if that makes sense for you.



Neighbors: Consider whether you should notify your neighbors about your plans to host, along with your plan for how to make sure your guests are not disruptive.



Subsidized Housing: If you live in public or subsidized housing there may be special rules that apply to you. The manager of the property may be able to answer questions about this.




General Regulations

What local regulations apply to me?


Taxes: Ensure you look up any local taxes or business license requirements that may apply. This may include things like hotel/transient occupancy tax, sales, and other turnover taxes such as Value Added Tax (VAT) or Goods and Services Tax (GST), or income tax.



Permits or Registrations: Ensure you look up any permitting, zoning, safety, and health regulations that may apply. The governing authorities that regulate the use and development of property in your area may have useful information on such regulations.



Rent Control/Rent Stabilization: If you live in rent controlled or stabilized housing, there may be special rules that apply to you. Contact your local Rent board to ask questions about this topic.



New York City Laws


What laws apply to me as a host in New York?


While we do not provide legal advice, we want to provide this non-exhaustive information to help you. Laws that may apply to hosts in New York include:



The New York State Multiple Dwelling Law. If your listing is in a single-family home or two- family buildings, this law restricting uses of “Class A” buildings does not apply to you. If you live in most apartment buildings in New York (ex: a building with three or more apartments), this law makes it illegal to host paying guests for less than 30 days unless a permanent resident of the apartment (like the host or the host’s roommate) also stays in the apartment during the guest’s stay.



Taxes. New York City and New York State impose multiple taxes that may apply to temporary guests (which the laws call “transient occupancy”) or tourist use, with some exemptions. Examples of taxes that could apply to your listing are state sales and use tax, City hotel room occupancy tax, and State and City room fees. You can get information about hotel sales taxes and about NYC hotel occupancy taxes. The word “hotel” has a broad definition that could apply to you.



Rent Regulation. Extra rules apply to rent stabilized and rent control properties. If you live in a rent-controlled property, you may be prohibited from subleasing your apartment. If you live in a rent-stabilized property, laws may restrict subleasing, the amounts you can sublease, or require advance notice to your landlord. Financial penalties, eviction or other remedies could apply. New York City Zoning Code. The New York City Zoning Code has zoning regulations that may apply to your property.



Business Licensing. The New York City Administrative Code requires certain businesses to obtain a license. You should look at these requirements to find out if you need a license to host. Learn how to start a business.



Other Rules. Other rules and regulations may apply to hosting, such as contracts you have with third parties like your lease, HOA rules, Housing Cooperative documents, and Condominium agreements.



We recommend you consult a local lawyer or tax professional to help you fully understand these laws. If you have questions about what laws may apply to you, you can contact the Department of Buildings , Department of Finance, or other city agencies directly.



Offline Payment Requests


Why should I only pay and communicate through Guesthouser?

What if someone asks to arrange payment through email or off the Guesthouser website? While the vast majority of our transactions are incident-free, it's good to know what to look for to avoid any potential payment scams.

All legitimate payments on Guesthouser take place through our website. If someone messages you on Guesthouser and asks you to contact them off-site to arrange payment details, please do not attempt to communicate or pay off-site. You can report people who ask you to do this by flagging the message—just look for the small flag icon in your message thread: If a guest or host contacts you after a booking request has been completed to discuss refunds or discounts in person contact Guesthouser right away. This is not allowed or approved by guesthouser.com and violates the user agreement between host and Guesthouser and traveller and Guesthouser.

We will never ask you to pay through your email. If you receive a personal email from anyone (including an automated@Guesthouser.com or any other username@Guesthouser.com email address) asking you to pay or accept payment off-site, immediately report it to safety@Guesthouser.com and end communication with the sender.

You should not receive a paper or PDF invoice from a host or from Guesthouser asking you for payment. Any of the following key words and similar terms should be immediately flagged or avoided: Western Union, MoneyGram, cashier’s check, money order, Liberty Reserve.

Paying and communicating only through the Guesthouser platform is vital to making your experience as positive and secure as possible. If your transaction happens offline and we have no record of it, it is almost impossible for us to assist you. Learn more about our payment system so you understand how it works.

To keep your account secure, be cautious of strange links in messages from other users, even ones you know, as their accounts may have been compromised. If you suspect that you have received a "phishing" message, immediately report it to safety@Guesthouser.com and end communication with the sender.

We also recommend you take advantage of verifications and other features we've made with your safety and trust in mind.


Pay and Communicate through Guesthouser


Why should I pay and communicate only through Guesthouser?

Guesthouser is a new way of doing business in an age-old industry. The vacation rental industry has always been vulnerable to risks and uncertainty. Guesthouser’s system is designed to give you peace of mind. Paying and communicating only through the Guesthouser platform is vital to making your experience as positive and secure as possible.

When you book through Guesthouser, payments go through our secure structure and are not released to the other party until after the reservation has begun. Guesthouser also provides private messaging for guests and hosts, profile verifications so you can learn more about who you’re transacting with, and the ability to flag content that may be suspicious.

By conducting your transactions on the site, you also have access to:

  • Our 24/7 customer service team.

  • The opportunity to review and be reviewed after your complete reservations.

  • An amazing community of like-minded people traveling, hosting, and reviewing listings on a nightly basis.

Hosts also enjoy:


  • A cancellation policy for your listing, enabling you to receive a partial or full payout in the event of a guest cancellation.

  • The comfort of the Guesthouser Host Guarantee

Guests also enjoy:


  • The safety of your funds in the event of a host cancellation.

  • The support of our Guest Refund Policy.

Paying outside the Guesthouser system is not secure, and we cannot provide access to these benefits when reservations aren’t booked directly through our website. If someone asks you to pay outside of Guesthouser, please report it to safety@Guesthouser.com immediately. Read more information here.


How do taxes work for hosts?
Local Tax

Your state or locality may impose a tax on the rental of rooms. In many places this is known as a occupancy tax, but may also be known as a lodging tax, a room tax, a use tax, a tourist tax, or hotel tax. We expect all hosts to familiarize themselves with and follow their local laws and regulations.
If you determine that you need to collect tax, you may either incorporate it into your nightly price, add it via a Special Offer, or ask your guests to pay it in person. In each case, it's important that guests are informed of the exact tax amount prior to booking.
If you choose to collect tax outside of your listing's rates, please note that it should be collected only upon arrival and that we are unable to assist with collection.
In some locations, Guesthouser has made agreements with government officials to collect and remit local taxes on behalf of hosts, making the tax collection process easier for all parties involved. For Guesthouser listings in these areas, applicable local taxes are calculated and collected at the time of booking. This won't affect the payouts you receive for reservations. As a host, you'll continue to collect your payout of accommodation fees minus Guesthouser service fees, just as you do today.
We're dedicated to keeping your personal information private—if at any point we're required to share any information with your local government, you'll be specifically notified of the needed disclosures.



Value Added Tax

If your country of residence is part of the European Union, you may need to assess Value Added Tax (VAT) on the services you provide. We encourage you to consult a tax advisor in your area for more insight on this and assistance assessing VAT on the services you provide if necessary. Additionally, Guesthouser is required to collect VAT on its service fees in countries that tax Electronically Supplied Services. Currently, that includes all countries in the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, and South Africa.



US Income Taxes

As a host, your gross earnings may be subject to US income taxes. To assist with US tax compliance, we collect taxpayer information from hosts in order to provide an account of their earnings each year. Even if you're not a US taxpayer, we may still require certain information from you. Learn more about why Guesthouser may request your taxpayer information.



To add your taxpayer information, go to your Payout Preferences and complete the appropriate form.

US persons may fill out a W-9 form. At the end of January, we'll provide hosts who've submitted a W-9 with a Form 1099-K showing their reportable earnings from the previous year. The IRS definition of US persons includes domestic corporations. Learn more about US tax classifications.

Non-US persons who have a Taxpayer Identification Number (either a Social Security Number or Employer Identification Number) may fill out a W-8ECI form. We'll provide hosts who submit a W-8ECI with a 1042-S form showing any US sourced earnings that they have. Non-US persons who do not have a Taxpayer Identification Number may fill out a W-8BEN form to certify their foreign status. We'll provide hosts who have submitted a W-8BEN with a Form 1042-S reporting any US sourced earnings. Unless valid tax treaty benefits have been claimed, Guesthouser is also required to withhold 30% on all payouts from US listings hosted by non-US persons.

If you're unsure of which form to submit, we encourage you to consult a tax professional who can clarify your tax status. If you've received a request to submit your taxpayer information and haven't yet provided it, we may be required to withhold a percentage of your earnings. We expect all hosts to comply with the tax regulations in their area.

Where’s my 2014 tax form?

Most hosts will receive a Form 1099 at the end of January. We’ll send out a dashboard alert when it’s ready. Once it’s uploaded, you’ll be able to access a PDF of your tax form at the bottom of your Payout Preferences page. Just click the red hyperlinked text under E-Statement. If you’ve opted to receive your form by mail as well, please expect it to arrive by mid-February. For the small number of hosts who will receive a Form 1042-S instead, it will be available online by the end of March.


What address will you mail my tax form to?

If you opted to also receive a tax form by mail, we’ll send it to the address you entered when submitting taxpayer information. To see that address, visit Payout Preferences. In the Taxpayer Information section, click Options and select Edit next to the taxpayer name.


What type of tax form will I receive?

It depends on the taxpayer information you submitted. Generally, hosts who submitted a W-9 will get a 1099-K. Service providers who submitted a W-9 and earned more than $600 in 2014 will get a 1099-Misc. If you’re a non-US person who submitted a W-8ECI, or have US earnings and completed a W-8BEN, you’ll receive a 1042-S.


How are fees, refunds, and other adjustments represented in my 1099-K?

The IRS requires that we calculate the amount for your 1099-K filing based on your gross volume. This means that we won't net out any fees, refunds, or other amounts. This includes adjustments for:

  • Host fees

  • Disputed charges• Refunded transactions

  • Refunded transactions

  • Other adjustments to your account


Why is the amount on my tax form higher than the amount I see in my Transaction History?

IRS rules require Guesthouser to report gross earnings, which includes the 3% host fee. In other words, the tax form reflects the price you set for guests (e.g., $100/night vs the $97 payout you received, after the Guesthouser host fee).


How can I correct an error on my tax form?

We are no longer accommodating changes to taxpayer information or assignments for the 2014 tax reporting year. Any changes to tax information made now will be reflected on your 2015 tax form.


What expenses can I deduct on my tax return?

Guesthouser isn't able to offer tax advice. We encourage you to consult a tax professional or the IRS website if you have any questions. Can I import my 1099 directly into Turbo Tax®, H&R Block®, or TaxACT®? Regrettably, we do not have this feature.

Why is Guesthouser requesting my taxpayer information?

As a US company, we’re required by US law to collect taxpayer information from hosts who appear to have US-sourced income. To add your taxpayer information, go to your Payout Preferences and complete the appropriate form. It only takes a minute or two!

Even if you're not a US person and have no US listings, we may be required to collect certain documentation from you to find out if your earnings through Guesthouser are not subject to US tax.

Depending on your tax status, we’ll provide you with a tax form showing your earnings for the year.

Whether or not you receive a form from us, it remains your responsibility to determine what amount to report as taxable income on your US Income tax return. We encourage you to consult
a tax professional if you need advice on reporting your income. One resource for information on
reporting rental income in the US is IRS publication 527: Residential Rental Property.

Why are taxes being withheld from my payouts?

If you received a request to submit your taxpayer information and haven’t yet provided it, we are required to withhold 28% from your payouts and remit the withholdings to the Internal Revenue Service in Washington, DC. You can avoid this by submitting your taxpayer information.

Once we receive your information, we won’t withhold from your future payouts. However, any amounts that have already been withheld and remitted to the IRS cannot be returned to you by Guesthouser.

The total amount withheld will be included on any tax forms issued to you so that you may account for these withholdings on your income tax return. We encourage you to consult a tax advisor if you need assistance accounting for any withholdings that have been remitted to the IRS on your behalf.
W8-BEN Taxpayers (Non-US persons with US listings)

Unless valid tax treaty benefits have been claimed on your W-8BEN, Guesthouser is required to withhold 30% on all payouts from US listings hosted by non-US persons and remit the funds directly to the IRS. At the end of the year, Guesthouser will report the total amount withheld and earnings to you on a Form 1042-S.

You may review or revise your Guesthouser taxpayer information in your Payout Preferences

How do I split income between multiple people for tax purposes?

For income to be divided between multiple people, you'll need to make sure that each person is paid directly through Guesthouser with a separate payout method. Then, you can assign a taxpayer to each payout method in your account. From your Payout Preferences:

  • 1. Click your name in the top-right corner of Guesthouser.com and select Account

  • 2. Click Payment Preferences in the left sidebar

  • 3. Add a payout method for each individual or entity who receives earnings from your account.

  • 4. Use payout routing rules to direct payouts by listing, or split payouts between two payout methods.

  • 5. Add tax information for each individual or entity.

  • 6. Assign each payout method to the appropriate taxpayer by clicking Options to the right of the payout method and selecting Assign Taxpayer. A drop-down menu will appear for you to select the correct taxpayer.


Keep in mind that only one taxpayer can be assigned to each payout method. New payout methods and those that have not been assigned to a specific taxpayer are assigned to the default taxpayer. You can set the default taxpayer from the Options menu next to the taxpayer at the bottom of your payout preferences.

What amounts are included on my tax form?

We're required by the IRS to report gross account transactions on tax forms. For each reservation, the gross amount is the price agreed upon before Guesthouser service fees. Any refunds in the form of adjustments that took place after your initial payout for the reservation are not netted out of the gross amount displayed on your form.

If you received payouts for purposes other than a reservation, or sent payouts to a charity, they may be included in the gross earnings shown on your form as well.

To reconcile your gross earnings:

  • 1. From your computer, head to Booking History

  • 2. At the top, click Gross Earnings

  • 3. At the top left, select the correct year

  • 4. From the top right, export your transaction history as a CSV file by clicking Export to CSV


The CSV file can be opened by any standard spreadsheet program (like Microsoft Excel, Google Docs, or Apple Numbers) to give you a display of the data. Once open, filter the Type column (column B) to only show Reservations. The sum of the Gross Earnings column (column O) should reconcile to the amount reported on your Form 1099-K.

While we are required to report gross income on your form, it remains your responsibility to determine what, from your total amount earned, to report as taxable income on your US Income tax return. We encourage you to consult a tax advisor if you need assistance deducting any non- taxable income from your taxes.

How do I change my taxpayer information?

To update your taxpayer information:

  • 1 Log into Guesthouser.com from your desktop computer

  • 2 Click your name in the top-right corner

  • 3 Select Account

  • 4 From the menu on the left, select Payout Preferences

  • 5 To the right of your Taxpayer Information, click Options

  • 6 Select Edit


Don't forget to click Submit after making any changes, and you're all set! Some fields aren't editable, so if you're trying to change your tax ID number, tax classification, or enter a different taxpayer entirely, please add a new taxpayer.
Changes made after December 15th, 2014 will be applied to the 2015 tax year.

How can I correct an error on my 1099 form?

You can edit your taxpayer information or change the way your earnings are assigned between multiple taxpayers from your Payout Preferences. Changes made after December 15th, 2014 will be applied to the 2015 tax year.

If you are noticing a discrepancy between the earnings shown on your tax form and the earnings shown in your Transaction History, or your form shows a higher amount than you were expecting, the reason is likely due to the fact that we are required to print gross earnings (inclusive of our 3% host fee) on your form. You can also read more about what amounts are included on your tax form.

What tax forms should I expect to receive from Guesthouser?I get my payouts through PayPal. Does Guesthouser report these earnings?

Hosts who have filled out a W-9 form will receive form 1099-K showing their earnings for the year, and hosts with US sourced earnings who have filled out a W-8 form will be provided form 1042-S. If you did not receive a tax form, please make sure to review to see if you should expect a form. If you think you've submitted the wrong information, you can also make changes to taxpayer information you've already submitted.

1099 Forms

  • Delivery. Any 1099 forms we issue to you will be available in your Payout Preferences. You'll receive an email notification when your form is ready, typically in late January of each year. We also mail a copy to the address you provided along with your taxpayer information, unless you opted for electronic delivery only.

  • Receiving multiple 1099s. You may receive both a 1099-K and a 1099-MISC form if you are both a host and an Guesthouser service provider. You may also receive more than one 1099-K form if your taxpayer information is listed on multiple Guesthouser accounts.

  • 1099-K. In previous years, we issued 1099-MISC forms to hosts. Starting with the 2013 tax year, we're sending 1099-K forms instead. This shouldn't change the way you file your taxes. As always, we encourage you to consult a tax professional for assistance reporting your income.


1042-S Forms

  • Delivery. The IRS requires that we mail 1042-S forms by the end of March. You'll receive a 1042-S form in the mail at the address you entered when you submitted your tax information.

I get my payouts through PayPal. Does Guesthouser report these earnings?

Guesthouser reports PayPal earnings in the United States only. As of 2013, we report all earnings on the 1099 forms we send to US hosts regardless of what payout method you use. PayPal has agreed to omit Guesthouser payouts from any tax forms they provide you for 2013 to avoid double reporting of Guesthouser income.

What local taxes apply to my listing and how do I collect them?

Your state or locality may impose a tax on the rental of rooms. In many places this is known as an occupancy tax, but may also be known as a room tax, a use tax, a tourist tax, or hotel tax. We expect all hosts to familiarize themselves with and follow their local laws and regulations. Hosts who determine they need to collect such a tax may either incorporate it into their nightly price, add it via a Special Offer, or ask their guests to pay it in person. In each case, it's important that guests are informed of the exact tax amount prior to booking.

In some locations, Guesthouser has made agreements with government officials to collect and remit local taxes on your behalf. This doesn’t change which taxes are due, but it does simplify and automate the process for Guesthouser reservations. If you have been alerted that your listing is in one of these areas, Guesthouser will calculate the tax, charge the guest, and remit the tax on your behalf.

Currently, Guesthouser is collecting and remitting taxes in the following locations: Multnomah County and Portland, Oregon USA
Guests who book Guesthouser listings that are located in the State of Oregon, Multnomah County and/or the City of Portland will pay the following taxes as part of their reservation:

  • Oregon Transient Lodging Tax: 1% of the listing price including any cleaning fee for reservations 30 nights and shorter. 1% is the State imposed tax rate only. For detailed information, visit Oregon.gov.

  • Multnomah County Transient Lodging Tax: 11.5% of the listing price including any cleaning fee for reservations 30 nights and shorter. 11.5% is the maximum Transient Lodging Tax for listings in Multnomah County (excluding the State level tax). For example, for Portland listings that are also located in Multnomah County, the Portland Transient Lodging Tax is 6% and the Multnomah County Transient Lodging Tax is 5.5%. For detailed information, visit PortlandOregon.gov.

  • Portland Transient Lodging Tax: 6% of the listing price including any cleaning fee for reservations 30 nights and shorter



San Francisco, CA USA
Guests who book Guesthouser listings that are located in San Francisco, CA will pay the following taxes as part of their reservation:

  • San Francisco Transient Occupancy Tax: 14% of the listing price including any cleaning fee for reservations 29 nights and shorter. 14% is the tax rate imposed by the City and County of San Francisco (the tax jurisdictions are one and the same). For detailed information, visit SFtreasurer.org.



Amsterdam, NL
Starting February 1, 2015, guests who book Guesthouser listings that are located in the City of Amsterdam, NL will pay the following taxes as part of their reservation:

  • Amsterdam Tourist Tax: 5% of the listing price including any cleaning fee. 5% is the tax rate imposed by the City of Amsterdam as of 1/1/2015. For detailed information, visit Amsterdam’s government website.



San Jose, CA USA
Starting February 1, 2015, guests who book Guesthouser listings that are located in San Jose, CA will pay the following taxes as part of their reservation:

  • San Jose Transient Occupancy Tax: 10% of the listing price including any cleaning fee for reservations 30 nights and shorter. For detailed information, visit SanJoseCa.gov.



Chicago, IL USA
Starting February 15, 2015, guests who book Guesthouser listings that are located in Chicago, IL will pay the following taxes as part of their reservation:

  • Chicago Hotel Accommodation Tax: 4.5% of the listing price including any cleaning fee for reservations 29 nights and shorter. For detailed information, visit CityofChicago.org.



District of Columbia USA
Starting February 15, 2015, guests who book Guesthouser listings that are located in the District of Columbia will pay the following taxes as part of their reservation:

  • DC Sales Tax on Hotels (transient accommodations): 14.5% of the listing price including any cleaning fee for reservations 90 nights and shorter. For detailed information, visit DC.gov.



Hosts located in these areas are responsible for assessing all other tax obligations, including state and city jurisdictions.

Who’s responsible for paying local taxes?

Hosts are responsible for following all laws and regulations, including paying any local taxes that apply to their accommodations.

If a listing is in an area where Guesthouser remits occupancy taxes on behalf of hosts, the tax is calculated and collected from guests at the time of booking, with no action needed from the host. The tax will be listed as a line item on all guest receipts, and shown within hosts’ Transaction History.

If you are a host whose listing is in an area where we are not currently remitting taxes on your behalf, read more about collecting local taxes.

Hosts who determine they need to collect such a tax may either incorporate it into their nightly price, add it via a Special Offer, or ask their guests to pay it in person. In each case, it's important that guests are informed of the exact tax amount prior to booking.

The taxes that are due vary by country, state, county and city. We understand that many of these rules are complex and difficult to follow. Guesthouser wants to help hosts follow the laws relevant to them, and is facilitating the collection and remittance guests on behalf of hosts in certain areas.

We'll continue to work with governments in other locations to explore ways to help facilitate tax collection. We're looking forward to continuing to partner with our community and neighborhoods to enrich the cities we all share.

Guesthouser is collecting incorrect local taxes for my listing. What should I do?

Guesthouser is only collecting taxes on behalf of hosts wherever we've collaborated with the local government and reached a signed agreement. This may include taxes from a city, county, state, tax jurisdiction, or a combination of these areas. If your listing is exempt from occupancy taxes by law or is in a tax exempt area, Guesthouser will not collect occupancy tax on reservations.

Occupancy taxes are calculated differently in every jurisdiction. There may be a percent based tax calculated from the price of a reservation; there may also be a per night tax, per person tax, or per person/per night tax.

If you believe that Guesthouser is collecting incorrect local taxes for your listing, contact us.

What is VAT and how does it apply to me?

Valued added tax, or VAT, is a tax assessed on the supply of goods and services. Guesthouser charges VAT on its service fees for users from the European Union, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, and South Africa.



Guests

VAT is charged at the time of payment and is based on the total guest fee for a reservation. If 1 you alter your reservation, VAT adjusts to reflect any change in the service fee. For reservations booked between May 1, 2014 and December 31, 2014, Guesthouser will calculate VAT based on the Irish VAT rate of 23% for all guests in the EU, regardless of country of residence. This change is related to Guesthouser’s new international headquarters in Dublin. On January 1, 2015, a new EU tax law takes effect. At this time, Guesthouser will go back to calculating VAT according to the rate in guests' local country of residence, based on the selection when you enter payment information.



Hosts

VAT is deducted from your payout and is based on total host fee for a reservation. If you alter your reservation, VAT adjusts to reflect any change in the service fee. For reservations booked between May 1, 2014 and December 31, 2014, Guesthouser will calculate VAT based on the Irish VAT rate of 23% for all hosts in the EU, regardless of country of residence. This change is related to Guesthouser’s new international headquarters in Dublin. On January 1, 2015, a new EU tax law takes effect. At this time, Guesthouser will go back to calculating VAT according to the rate in hosts’ local country of residence, based on the selection when you add a payout method.

Where can I find my VAT invoice?

Your VAT invoices can be found in the same place as your guest billing receipt or host confirmation on the desktop version of Guesthouser.
A VAT invoice is provided whenever VAT is assessed on Guesthouser service fees. An invoice is finalized and issued when a reservation is accepted, and includes your information (name, address, etc) as you entered it in your Guesthouser account. Guesthouser is not able to modify a VAT invoice after it's been issued.

If you add a verified VAT ID number to your account, this will be included on VAT invoices created after the addition. If you'll need additional documentation for travel, we encourage you to communicate with your host` before booking to see if they're able to assist you. For reservation details, reference your billing receipt or host confirmation.

How can I provide my VAT ID number?

If you’re a host operating as a business or a guest paying with an employer’s payment method, and you have a VAT ID number registered with the EU, you may enter your VAT ID number in your profile. If your VAT ID number can be verified by the European Commission, you won’t be charged VAT on our service fees and it will be your responsibility to self-assess whether you need to pay VAT for the use of our services. Please see the VIES website for a list of proper formats for VAT ID numbers by member state.